Beach Weekly Episode 10: The search for a new mascot

For a special 10th edition in the news roundup, this podcast delves into all things related to the Long Beach State mascot, or lack thereof. Beach Weekly host James Chow interviews reporters Perry Continente, Rachel Barnes and Paula Kiley, who helped cover and contribute to the new mascot conversation. While Continente and Kiley go over their own stories, Barnes discusses an opinion piece written by reporter Josh Sepetjian about the consequent changes for the campus moving away from the 49er brand. 0:42: ASI resolution brings new mascot discussion to the student body 3:30: Opinion piece on mascot discussion impacting 49er promotional material 6:45: The creators behind the "Giraffe 4 Mascot" campaign https://soundcloud.com/daily49er/beach-weekly-episode-10 Music used: Bensound - Funky Suspense

By | 2019-04-07T18:57:51+00:00 Feb 8, 2019 | 10:14 pm|Categories: Multimedia, News, Podcasts, Today|Tags: , , , , , , , , |

In the search for a new mascot, LBSU is missing the big picture

The conversation over which woodland creature or campus landmark best represents us is a fun and ultimately harmless diversion from the stress of a new term, but it’s still distracting from a larger issue. We, as a campus community, are failing to address the fact that the retirement of Pete the Problematic Prospector is the tip of the iceberg when it comes to the changes in Long Beach State’s future. The decision to retire Pete came from an Associated Students Inc. resolution from March 2018, and the language in that resolution isn’t limited to only the change of mascot. It stated that Long Beach would dissociate itself from “all aspects that glorify the gold rush era; be it the mascot, merchandise, statues, promotional material, events, or phrase 49er.” If you’ve ever set foot on the Long Beach State campus, you know that would mean a lot of changes. We’re not just talking about moving a statue. We’re talking about a campuswide revamp of the entire school’s image. The Nugget, The Outpost, The 49er Shops and even the publication you are currently reading may have to undergo changes to conform to these new standards. Changes like this need to be clearly

By | 2019-02-08T21:30:58+00:00 Feb 6, 2019 | 8:40 pm|Categories: Columns, Opinions, Showcase, Today|Tags: , , , , |

Beach Weekly: Episode 4

In this week's regularly scheduled podcast, Assistant News Editor James Chow goes over the new alumni center and talks to Daily 49er reporters who covered this week's ASI and Pregnant and Parenting Students Club's meetings. Alumni Center: 0:26 ASI Senate Meeting: 1:04 Pregnant and Parenting Students Club 7:01 https://soundcloud.com/daily49er/beach-weekly-episode-4

By | 2019-04-07T19:09:13+00:00 Nov 9, 2018 | 10:34 pm|Categories: Multimedia, News, Podcasts, Today|Tags: , , , , , , |

LBSU limits Prospector Pete merch after retirement announcement

Students will soon be seeing a lot less of Prospector Pete in the 49er Shops Bookstore after President Jane Close Conoley announced that the 51-year-old statue is officially retired, Sept. 20. According to Kierstin Stickney, director of marketing and communications at 49er Shops, the merchandise for the mascot has never been one of the university’s biggest sellers. Stickney said she has not seen any change in sales for Prospector Pete merchandise after the announcement that he was officially ousted. She noted that a sweatshirt with the mascot was on clearance for its poor sales rather than the retirement. “Our intention for the future is to continue to carry a limited amount of Pete merchandise, along with brown and gold items, for our customers looking for nostalgic Long Beach gear,” Stickney said in an email. In Conoley’s email blast, she cited the desire to move away from the California Gold Rush era as a reason for the mascot’s retirement. The statue will be moved to an alumni center, which is still in development. Susie Jones, a fourth year communication studies major and American Indian Cultures minor, facilitated a discussion about the controversy surrounding Prospector Pete in her Social Movements and Protest

By | 2018-10-24T12:35:41+00:00 Oct 23, 2018 | 11:07 pm|Categories: Campus, News, Today|Tags: , , , , , , |

Join us for a luncheon celebrating Prospector Pete on the occasion of his retirement

With three words – A New Era – LBSU’s beloved-by-alumni and despised-by-activists mascot Prospector Pete, who would have turned 52 next year, was forced into an early retirement by campus President Jane Close Conoley. Compared to other university mascots, such as the 88-year-old USC Tommy Trojan and the 129-year-old Yale Handsome Dan, Pete was still in his prime. Who knows what he could have accomplished if given the chance? After all, you do realize Pete isn’t a real person and the gold rush didn’t happen in Long Beach, right? So why then, as a history professor once asked me, do we have a prospector as a mascot? If that professor knew their university history, they would’ve known why. Founded in 1949, not 1849, Long Beach State went from concept to campus in less than a year. P. Victor Peterson was recruited to be the president of the new college and was a builder. A connector. A prospector, if you will. Although he didn’t prospect gold, he prospected resources in the form of faculty, staff, students and supplies for the new State College. President Peterson soon came to be known on-campus as “President Pete,” and was hailed for his pioneering spirit.

By | 2018-10-11T12:26:07+00:00 Oct 10, 2018 | 9:11 pm|Categories: Columns, Opinions, Today|Tags: , , , |

Our View: The staff discusses Prospector Pete

After decades of back and forth deliberation on what to do about Prospector Pete, Long Beach State President Jane Close Conoley announced Sept. 21 that the university would finally retire the 51-year-old mascot from his perch between Liberal Arts 4 and 5. The reactions have been strong on both sides of the argument, with many celebrating the removal of a monument that to many, symbolizes genocide, while others believe that focusing on this controversy is a waste of energy. Conoley also added that the statue would be moved to the new alumni center, which is still in a developmental stage. In response to this, the Daily 49er editorial board discussed how the university handled the situation. Much like the university and the community, the staff is pretty divided.   Carlos Villicana City Editor I don’t care about the statue or how the school handled the announcement of its retirement as a mascot. If you’re offended about a statue being moved from its spot next to a brick you spent over a hundred dollars for, you have too much money. If you’re offended about a statue being moved from a spot next to bricks you didn’t even pay for, your investment

By | 2018-10-04T11:45:13+00:00 Oct 3, 2018 | 9:36 pm|Categories: Editorials, Opinions, Today|Tags: , , , , |

President Conoley confirms retirement of Prospector Pete

President Jane Close Conoley sent out an email to the campus announcing the official “retirement” of the 51-year-old Prospector Pete mascot Thursday afternoon. “Inclusive excellence is a core value of the Long Beach State University community,” Conoley said in a statement. “Our work in this arena is never done. We want to ensure that we hear from as many people as possible who have a stake not only in the issue at hand, but also in the life and history of our campus.” The statue will be moved from the front of Liberal Arts 5 to an alumni center, which is still in development, as previously reported by the Daily 49er. An Associated Students Inc. March resolution helped initiate the move to retire Prospector Pete and argued prospectors' role in the colonization of Indigenous American communities as a reason for the move. Long Beach State was established in 1949, more than 100 years after the California gold rush. The university was constructed on top of Puvungna village, a burial site of the Los Angeles-based Indigenous Tongva Tribe. The statue, formally called the Forty-Niner Prospector, was built by Ben Baker in March 1967, and has since received criticism from American Indigenous

By | 2018-09-23T19:02:46+00:00 Sep 21, 2018 | 1:37 am|Categories: Campus, News, Showcase, Today|Tags: , , , |
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