LBSU water fill stations receive regular maintenance

When a chemistry professor and a couple students tested campus water stations due to concerns over the water condition last year, Long Beach State found itself shutting off campus water fountains due to small traces of lead that were found. According to the Daily 49er, then Vice President of Administration and Finance, Mary Stephens had expressed that “some of the fountains did not meet the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency standards for drinkable water.” With over 100 refill stations and general water fountains around campus, Tony Malagrino, associate vice president of Physical Planning and Facilities, said that last year’s lead scare had been a “PR nightmare.” Malagrino said the school has always worked alongside the Long Beach Water Department to deliver the best quality water to the campus. “It ended up being a positive exercise because we positively checked all of the water that makes its way to the buildings,” Malagrino said. Director of Design and Construction Services, Mark Zakhour said he hopes students eventually become comfortable with the water systems on campus. “It was the old drinking fountains that had a small trace amount of lead, but it was way below the EPA thresholds for anything that would cause any

By | 2019-04-08T11:59:53-07:00 Feb 17, 2019 | 5:30 pm|Categories: Campus, News, Showcase, Today|Tags: , , , |

Test results for drinking fountains at Cal State Long Beach may be around the corner

As members of Cal State Long Beach continue to quench their thirst with store-bought water bottles, officials finally revealed a solution for the bagged drinking fountains. According to Mary Stephens, vice president of administration and finance, the majority of water testing results conducted by Titan Environmental were completed Dec. 1. The campus will receive an email sometime during the week that will contain test results and any additional information about the process. In late October, a CHEM 100 class taught by Elaine Bernal tested drinking fountains in the McIntosh building and found that some of the drinking fountains had tested positive for lead. On Nov. 8, campus officials confirmed the results in preliminary testing stages. All fountains on campus have since been declared out of order and covered with blue tape and black bags. A public forum will be held Dec. 8 in Hall of Science 105 to address the issue and to quell any concerns that campus members may have. The forum will be led by Stephens and Tony Malagrino, director of facilities management, and will include a doctor from the Long Beach health department, a woman who heads water testing from the Long Beach Water Department and a

By | 2017-12-03T18:12:54-07:00 Dec 3, 2017 | 6:12 pm|Categories: News, Today|Tags: , , , , , |

Closed drinking fountains at CSULB continue to raise questions

After multiple rounds of testing since early November, the university has yet to release a clear update on the state of water at Cal State Long Beach. On Nov. 8, the drinking fountains in the McIntosh Humanities building were confirmed to have tested positive for lead. A day before, water fountains on campus were shut down and bound with tape. According to Mary Stephens, vice president of administration and finance, this closure was due to the water quality being below Environmental Protection Agency standards. Terri Carbaugh, vice president of public affairs, said the tests are still ongoing and the final results will not be available for several weeks due to diligent water testing in all buildings constructed after 1980. “We’re testing the water, retesting [and] redoing [tests] and double-checking — and we’ll release all that information in a few weeks,” Carbaugh said. The water, currently being tested by Fullerton-based company Titan Environmental, was deemed unsafe to drink after a CHEM 100 class found lead in the fountains by the McIntosh building. All of the buildings put up after 1980 are being tested for lead. Buildings constructed before that time will have those water fountains replaced altogether, according to Carbaugh. The

By | 2017-11-28T22:10:14-07:00 Nov 28, 2017 | 9:10 pm|Categories: Campus, News, Showcase, Today|Tags: , , , , , , , |

Testing the waters at Cal State Long Beach

Almost a month after multiple drinking fountains at Cal State Long Beach tested positive for lead by a CHEM 100 class, campus members are still awaiting results from the university as to whether the rest of the fountains are affected. “Testing is ongoing,” said Terri Carbaugh, assistant vice president of public affairs. “...our timeline [for the results] is as soon as possible. It could be several weeks. We hope sooner, but we can’t say for certain.” On Nov. 7 an email blast sent by Mary Stephens, vice president of administration and finance, announced that certain water fountains on campus were tested and did not meet Environmental Protection Agency standards. Just a few weeks before, on Oct 19., a CHEM 100 class used a strip test to examine the water in drinking fountains in the McIntosh building as a part of a semesterly assignment. After administration was notified of the students’ findings, the university conducted their own water test on Nov. 2 in the McIntosh building, which confirmed the initial results. According to Heather Hershberger, a graduate student studying biochemistry who worked with lecturer Elaine Bernal’s chemistry class to facilitate the initial testing, results were available within 10 minutes. According to

By | 2017-11-14T21:16:52-07:00 Nov 14, 2017 | 9:16 pm|Categories: Campus, News, Today|Tags: , , , , , |

Drinking fountains in the McIntosh building at CSULB tested positive for lead

It was confirmed Wednesday that drinking fountains in the McIntosh Humanities building at Cal State Long Beach tested positive for lead. As a component of the CHEM 100 class, students test the drinking fountains each semester at various locations on campus — only this time, they actually found something. The tests were conducted on Oct. 19 and were reported to facilities and administration. “We tested the second floor of the McIntosh building and that’s where the results were found,” said Elaine Bernal, chemistry and biochemistry lecturer for the class that discovered the results. “[This] certainly puts a call out for proactive measures on behalf of the university to test our water periodically.” Bernal said her CHEM 100 students tested the drinking fountains of 10 sites, all of which tested negative except for the ones in the McIntosh building. According to Terri Carbaugh, associate vice president of public affairs, after the university was approached with concerns from faculty regarding the water Oct. 26, the university conducted their own testing Nov. 2. “At that point there was a lot of fear,” Carbaugh said. “We just want to make sure that we are doing everything in our power to make sure everyone understands

CSULB drinking fountains turned off after water was found to be unsafe: Updated

Update (Nov. 8 1:40 p.m.): It was confirmed Wednesday that the drinking fountains in the McIntosh Humanities building at Cal State Long Beach tested positive for lead. In a Facebook comment posted to the Daily 49er’s page, chemistry and biochemistry lecturer Elaine Bernal said her CHEM 100 students tested the drinking fountains in 10 sites, which all tested negative except for the ones in the McIntosh building. An email blast was sent out Wednesday to all employees and students from Mary Stephens, vice president of administration and finance, to notify campus members that all non-filtered drinking fountains on campus will be tested. “The [Cal State University Employees Union] is very concerned for the health and safety of our represented staff as well as the entire campus community,” said Jennifer Moran, union chapter 315 president in an email statement. “We will continue to closely monitor the situation to determine if further action is required on our part to ensure an appropriate level of safety is achieved. The Daily 49er has reached out to Bernal for comment and is waiting for a response. It is unclear at this time which and how many fountains have been affected. This story will continue to

By | 2017-11-10T00:36:42-07:00 Nov 7, 2017 | 11:12 pm|Categories: Campus, News, Today|Tags: , , , , |