Arts & Life, Events

Museum of Latin American Art in Long Beach opens virtual exhibit “HERland”

Long Beach’s Museum of Latin American Art had announced the opening of a new virtual exhibit focusing on the work of women artists titled “HERland: Women Artists from the MOLAA Collection.”

The virtual exhibit debuted on Feb. 7 and was created by the museum’s Chief Curator Gabriela Urtiaga.

“HERland: Women Artists from the MOLAA Collection” was inspired by the 1915 novel of the same name, which according to Urtiaga in a digital letter on MOLAA’s website, tells the story of a utopian paradise where women reside in a communitarian society.

Now, MOLAA presents their own version of “HERland,” Urtiaga said, “in a world where the discussion about women empowering, race, class, and equity is more relevant (and necessary) than ever before.”

“This selection of women artists that we present today is part of the MOLAA Permanent Collection, and by sharing them with our public we begin a new approach to our history as an institution,” Urtiaga said in her letter. “In addition to broadening our perspective and delving into those works that speak of certain topics, many times invisible in the history of art, such as the creation of female artists.”

"Heroines III" by Venezuelan Artist, Amalia Caputo. Created in 2007. Shared with The Daily 49er by the Museum of Latin American Arts
“Heroines III” by artist Amalia Caputo, created in 2007. Currently on display at the “HERland” exhibit. Photo courtesy of Museum of Latin American Art.
"Broken" by American Artist, Patssi Valdez. Created in 1992. Currently on display at the Museum of Latin American Arts.
“Broken” by artist Patssi Valdez, created in 1992. Currently on display at the “Herland” exhibit at MOLAA. Photo courtesy of Museum of Latin American Art.

The art exhibit will have, in total, 56 different art pieces created by 44 women. Each piece, according to CEO and President of MOLAA Lourdes Ramos-Rivas, will invite the viewers to “walk a territory in which they address essential issues, such as equity, gender and race.”

“The exhibition reveals common stories, told from different geographies, with different faces, that converge as an affirmation of a female empowerment that knows no borders,” Lourdes said in a press release on Feb. 5.

Some of the artists whose work is a part of the exhibit include Los Angeles-based multidisciplinary artist Carmen Argote, photographer Amalia Caputo, painter Ofelia Rodriguez and L.A. born and raised multidisciplinary artist Patssi Valdez.

"La Ultima Magnolia" by Mexican Artist, Carmen Argote. Created in 2016. Currently on display at the HERland Exhibit in the MOLAA
“La Ultima Magnolia” by artist Carmen Argote, created in 2016. Currently on display at the “HERland” Exhibit in the MOLAA. Photo courtesy of Museum of Latin American Art.
"Paijase con dos hemisferios flotando" by Colombian Artist, Ofelia Rodriguez. Created in 2006. Currently on display at the HERland Exhibit in the MOLAA
“Paijase con dos hemisferios flotando” by Colombian Artist, Ofelia Rodriguez, created in 2006. Currently on display at the “HERland” exhibit at the MOLAA. Photo courtesy of Museum of Latin American Art.

The virtual exhibit is separated into four different sections depending on theme, including Surrealism, Representation, Boundaries and Distortion.

Viewers can navigate through the exhibit with their computer as they would walking in a physical gallery. Information about each piece will be available as well.

The Virtual Gallery of the Museum of Latin American Arts's HERland Exhibit. The virtual gallery is open to all on their website.
The virtual gallery of the Museum of Latin American Arts’s “HERland” exhibit, accessible through their website. Photo courtesy of Museum of Latin American Art.

“HERland” was originally scheduled to be open to the public last year in the spring 2020. However, due to the coronavirus pandemic, the exhibit was put on hold.

Now, the exhibit will continue until January 2022. MOLAA also stated on their website that the exhibit will be available for in-person viewing “upon the Museum’s reopening to the public.”

Visit the virtual exhibit online at MOLAA’s website.

2 Comments

  1. Pingback: Artists adapting to the pandemic - Daily Forty-Niner

  2. Pingback: MOLAA unveils new Afro-Latinx art exhibit - Daily Forty-Niner

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published.

Daily 49er newsletter