A psychedelic look into mental illness

The colorful ,60s inspired ceramics capture people’s attention while the powerful message captures people’s minds in this week's student art galleries. Senior bachelor of fine arts student Corrie Wille produces art inspired by her struggle with depression.

By | 2019-04-11T16:31:14+00:00 Apr 9, 2019 | 6:57 pm|Categories: Arts & Life, Fine Arts, HP Arts & Life, HP Secondary, main slider|Tags: , , , , , , |

‘Nine’ — more than just a number

Nine Bachelor of Fine Art students came together with a culmination of different artworks and ideas in their group exhibition, "Nine" in the School of Art Galleries. The name of the exhibit, while it represents the number of artists involved, is a tribute to the number nine and its many symbols, such as representing the completion of a cycle in numerology and the number of an inward voyage in tarot cards. As written in the group's exhibit description, the meanings of "Nine" represent these ideas as the students are soon to embark on a new journey after completing their BFA degrees. Videos, photos, books and more are displayed throughout “Nine,” all ranging in different subjects from culture and sexuality to veteran PTSD therapy and other topics. The Daily 49er sat down with three of the nine artists of the exhibit to gain more insight on the creative process and artistic inspirations of the project.   Andrew Fischer, senior, BFA in photography Fischer created the video “Operation Raw Hide.” His eight minute video features surfing as an alternative therapy to “heal the mind” of veterans suffering from post traumatic stress disorder. After you graduate, what kind of things are you planning

By | 2018-12-12T18:43:49+00:00 Dec 12, 2018 | 6:43 pm|Categories: Arts & Life, Features, Fine Arts|Tags: , , , , , |

In Photos: ‘Nine’ exhibit hosts a diverse range of artistic viewpoints

Nine Bachelor of Fine Art students came together with a culmination of different artworks and ideas in their group exhibition, "Nine." The name of the exhibit, while it represents the number of artists involved, is a tribute to the number nine and its many symbols, such as representing the completion of a cycle in numerology and the number of an inward voyage in tarot cards. As written in the group's exhibit description, the meanings of "Nine" represent these ideas as the students are soon to embark on a new journey after completing their BFA degrees.

By | 2018-12-12T18:38:52+00:00 Dec 12, 2018 | 12:42 am|Categories: Arts & Life, Fine Arts|Tags: , , , , , |

Conscious Collection brings artists of marginalized groups together

Murmurs of conversation and contemporary music filled the University Student Union Room 100 as the Conscious Collection art exhibit kicked off. Conscious Collection was released last Thursday by Associated Students Inc. and brought people from marginalized communities together. Art presented at the exhibit was showcased by members of select communities including students who are undocumented, students with disabilities, international students, members of the LGBTQ community and those with mental illnesses. Long Beach State University Board of Directors’ staff representative, Colette Redden opened the exhibit discussion with a quote from French artist Henri Matisse: “Creativity takes courage.” The pieces varied from photographs, paintings, poems and sculptures. Photographer Sonia De Los Santos created “Tamalera” and “Botes,” photos of working-class citizens in pushing carts along the city streets. To Carmen Varela, the director of Disabled Student Services, these pieces represented the work ethic of Americans and what it takes to earn one’s living regardless of what they do. "There’s honor in all work … immigrants are only working to survive whether it’s collecting recyclables or working at a hotel,” Varela said. “In this country, immigrants are vilified only when they are trying to survive, to feed their families and do what they need

By | 2018-12-09T21:22:40+00:00 Dec 9, 2018 | 9:21 pm|Categories: Arts & Life, Events|Tags: , , , , |

Artist explores an interesting coping mechanism with ‘Witti-Schism’

For many, paper-cutting is a task, whether it’s cutting out paper for a class poster board or creating intricate snowflakes for festive dorm room decor. But third-year Illustration Bachelor of Fine Arts student Natalie Rosen, papercutting has turned it into an art form. Sixty five paper-cut houses and over 800 individually cut paper pieces hang from the ceiling in one of Rosen’s several paper artworks in her gallery “Witti-Schism” at the School of Art Galleries at Long Beach State. Her gallery dives into the idea of herself — and others — going through a mental breakdown but using humor to “soften the blow.” Rosen combined paper, sculptures and drawings to translate her feelings of frustration and grief, as well as the humor that helps her deal with it. In her elaborate papercut house piece titled “Commons,” Rosen displays a long snake weaving in and out of the houses as a symbolization for the conflict and pain that affects different families. This idea of dealing with pain and conflict is something that Rosen has dealt with herself and has also witnessed with her friends and peers, and thought it would be interesting to bring it to life in her art. “[‘Commons’]

By | 2018-11-28T21:02:55+00:00 Nov 27, 2018 | 10:38 pm|Categories: Arts & Life, Fine Arts|Tags: , , , |

In Photos: Artist dives into personal conflicts with hints of comedy

"Witti-Schism" at Long Beach State’s School of Arts Galleries features a series of paper-cut and clay sculptures in a theme of witticism, a witty remark and schism, a division between two things. Third year illustration Master of Fine Arts major Natalie Rosen created the gallery to express thoughts and feelings that frustrate her, while also adding elements of humor to comfort her when she’s feeling down.  

By | 2018-11-27T22:43:43+00:00 Nov 27, 2018 | 12:06 am|Categories: Arts & Life, Fine Arts|Tags: , , , , |

Student art galleries replace regular exhibitions with grad student critique week

The School of Art galleries at Long Beach State changed up the typical student exhibitions this week, with a special Graduate Critique Week located in the Fine Arts Building on campus. The weekly themed exhibitions were replaced by a variety of artwork from students across all art departments, in an effort to provide them with a space to have their work critiqued by artists, curators or other gallery exhibitionists outside of the LBSU community. Sculptures, paintings, installations, video projections and more will be individually critiqued for five hours every night this week to provide the students with in-depth feedback. One student featured during critique week is Briana Miyoko, a second year pursuing a Master of Fine Arts in drawing and painting. Through her piece, “Passage, Santa Ynez,” Miyoko uses a combination of sculpture, rocks and a video reel of flowing lava to examine the aftermath of a natural disaster. Miyoko was inspired to create “Passage, Santa Ynez” after witnessing a natural disaster in Santa Barbara and helping with the aftermath of an earthquake in New Zealand. “Seeing a place that was my home and coming back and seeing it changed was definitely a really personal thing,” Miyoko said. Tackling a

In Photos: Artists get community feedback

All five galleries in the Fine Arts Building contain artwork from a variety of Master of Fine Art students in this weeks Graduate Critique Week. The week allows MFA graduate students to receive feedback on their artwork from people throughout the community, in addition to the critique classes they are mandated to take at Long Beach State. A wide variety of artworks are shown ranging from sculpture, painting, video, installation and more.

By | 2018-11-06T18:19:08+00:00 Nov 5, 2018 | 9:25 pm|Categories: Arts & Life, Fine Arts|Tags: , , , |
Load More Posts