2020 Election, News, Special Projects, Voter Registration

What’s on the 2020 ballot: propositions

Proposition 14: Stem Cell Research Institute Bond Initiative

Subject: Bonds

A “yes” vote supports the financial backing of $5.5 billion in bonds to the State Stem Cell Research Institute in order to make changes in terms of command structure and programs. 

A “no” vote opposes this financial backing of the State Stem Cell Research Institute, which received and exhausted funds acquired in 2019 from Proposition 71, originally voted for in 2004. 

Proposition 15: Tax on Commercial and Industrial Properties for Education and Local Government Funding Initiative 

Subject: Taxes

A “yes” vote supports the requirement of commercial and industrial properties to be taxed based on their market value over their purchase price.

A “no” vote opposes this modification and thus will continue to tax commercial and industrial properties based on their purchase price.

Proposition 16: Repeal Proposition 209 Affirmative Action Amendment

Subject: Affirmative Action

A “yes” vote supports the removal of Proposition 209, originally on the ballot in 1996, which prohibited government and public institutions from discriminating against or granting preferential treatment to people of color, race, sex or national origin in public employment, public education and public contracting. This would make affirmative action legal.

A “no” vote opposes the removal of Proposition 209 and would keep the proposition in place. Government and public institutions would continue to be prohibited from discriminating or granting preferential treatment to people of color, race, sex or national origin in public employment, public education and public contracting.

Proposition 17: Voting Rights Restoration for Persons on Parole Amendment

Subject: Suffrage

A “yes” vote supports this constitutional amendment, which would restore the right to vote to people on parole who were convicted of felonies.

A “no” vote opposes this constitutional amendment, and would continue to prevent people on parole who were convicted of felonies from voting. 

Illustration by Madalyn Amato

Proposition 18: Primary Voting for 17-Year-Olds Amendment

Subject: Suffrage

A “yes” vote supports the amendment to allow 17-year-olds, who will be 18 during the next presidential election, to vote in primaries. 

A “no” vote opposes the amendment, and would continue to prohibit 17-year-olds, who will be 18 during the next presidential election, to vote in primaries. 

Proposition 19: The Property Tax Transfers, Exemptions and Revenue for Wildfire Agencies and Counties Amendment

Subject: Taxes

A “yes” vote supports the permission of homeowners who are older than 55, severely disabled or whose homes were destroyed by fires or disaster to transfer their property tax base value to another residence of any value. This would allow these individuals to pay the same amount of taxes in an even more expensive home. 

A “no” vote opposes this property tax break and will continue to have homeowners who are older than 55, severely disabled or whose homes were destroyed by fires or disaster to transfer their property tax base value to a residence of equal or lower value. 

Proposition 20: Criminal Sentencing, Parole and DNA Collection Initiative

Subject: Law Enforcement

A “yes” vote supports adding crimes to the list of felonies. This would make specific types of theft and fraud crimes to be chargeable as misdemeanors or felonies instead of only as misdemeanors. 

A “no” vote opposes adding more crimes to the list of felonies.

Proposition 21: Local Rent Control Initiative

Subject: Housing 

A “yes” vote supports local governments to enact rent control on housing that was first occupied 15 years ago. This provides an exception to landlords with no more than two homes with distinct titles like “single family unit.”

A “no” vote opposes this initiative and would thus continue to prohibit rent control in housing that was occupied 15 years ago and single-family homes.

Proposition 22: App-Based Drivers as Contractors and Labor Policies Initiative

Subject: Business

A “yes” vote supports this initiative and would consider app-based drivers, like Uber, Lyft and Postmates, as independent contractors and enact labor policies related to their app-based companies. 

A “no” vote opposes this initiative and would have California Assembly Bill 5, voted for in 2019, decide whether an app-based driver is an employee or an independent contractor. 

Proposition 23: Dialysis Clinic Requirements Initiative

Subject: Healthcare

A “yes” vote supports the initiative to require dialysis clinics to have an on-site physician present while patients are being treated, as well as data of infections reported and state health department consent before closing a clinic. The initiative will also prevent clinics to discriminate against a patient based upon their method of paying for care.

A “no” vote opposes this initiative and would allow dialysis clinics to operate without these regulations put in place.

Proposition 24: Consumer Personal Information Law and Agency Initiative

Subject: Business

A “yes” vote supports the expansion of California’s consumer data privacy laws including modifications to prevent direct businesses from sharing their consumers’ personal information. A “yes” vote would also support the creation of the Privacy Protection Agency to enforce consumer data privacy laws. 

A “no” vote opposes the expansion of consumer data privacy laws and opposes the creation of the Privacy Protection Agency. 

Proposition 25: Replace Cash Bail with Risk Assessments Referendum

Subject: Trials

A “yes” vote supports the replacement of cash bails with risk assessment instead for detained suspects awaiting trials.

A “no” vote opposes this replacement and would maintain the use of cash bail for detained suspects awaiting trials. 

Sources: Ballotpedia and Sierra Darwin, Associated Students, Inc. Lobby Corps representative

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